University of Cambridge

Joe Herbert

University of Cambridge

University of Cambridge

Joe Herbert

University of Cambridge

Joe Herbert, M.B., Ph.D., is an emeritus professor of neuroscience and former chair of the Graduate School of Biosciences at the University of Cambridge. His research of the interaction between hormones and the brain spans both experimental and clinical studies, including experimental studies on sex behavior; stress, corticoids and their effects on the formation of new cells in the brain; the roles of genes, psychosocial environment and hormones in the risk for depression, and depression as a risk for later Alzheimer’s disease; and the influence of genes and hormones on financial decision-making and risk perception.

Erasmus School of Economics

Peter Wakker

Erasmus School of Economics

Erasmus School of Economics

Peter Wakker

Erasmus School of Economics

Peter Wakker is professor of decisions under uncertainty at the Econometric Institute of Erasmus School of Economics (ESE). He works in behavioral economics and on risk and ambiguity.

Wakker has published in leading journals in economics, business, medicine, psychology, statistics, and mathematics. He was nominated the best-publishing Dutch economist in the years 1994, 1998, 2003, and 2007, and was ranked 90th in the world in the ISI’s most cited scientists in economics and business in 2003. He received a Medical Decision Making Career Achievement Award (2007), the Frank P. Ramsey Medal (2013; highest award of INFORMS Decision Analysis Society), and an Honorary doctorate in economics (University of St. Gallen 2016).

Wakker frequently gives advices on insurance in the media.

Wakker is a director of the research group Behavioral Economics.

CALTECH

Colin Camerer

CALTECH

CALTECH

Colin Camerer

CALTECH

Professor Colin F. Camerer is the Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Finance and Economics at the California Institute of Technology (located in Pasadena, California), where he teaches cognitive psychology and economics. He is a pioneer in behavioral economics and in neuroeconomics. He is interested in how psychological forces and their deeper neuroscientific foundations influence economic decisions involving individuals and markets. In his research, he uses experiments to better understand how individuals and markets function, neuroscience to gain insight into the neuroscientific drivers for decision making and behavior, and game theory.

Princeton

Elke Weber

Princeton

Princeton

Elke Weber

Princeton

Elke U. Weber is the Jerome A. Chazen Professor of International Business at Columbia Business School and Professor of Psychology and Earth Institute Professor at Columbia University. She is an expert on behavioral models of decision-making under risk and uncertainty, investigating psychologically and neurally plausible ways to model individual differences in risk taking and discounting, specifically in risky financial situations and environmental decisions. She believes that psychological theory needs to interface with social problems in a two-way dialogue, proving itself with constructive solutions in real-world settings and being enriched and constrained by those settings. While much of her work draws distinctions between homo economicus and homo sapiens, she also examines individual, group, and cultural differences in discounting or risk taking and how best to assess and model them.​

MIT

David G. Rand

MIT

MIT

David G. Rand

MIT

David Rand is an associate professor of Psychology, Economics, and Management at Yale University, a member of the Yale Institute for Network Science, Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and Cognitive Sciences Program, and the director of Yale University’s Human Cooperation Laboratory as well as the Applied Cooperation Team that partners with organizations outside the academy to run field experiments. His research combines a range of theoretical and experimental methods in an effort to explain the high levels of cooperation that typify human societies, and to uncover ways to promote cooperation in situations where it is lacking.